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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 4, issue 5
Biogeosciences, 4, 715–728, 2007
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-4-715-2007
© Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

Special issue: Greenhouse gases in the Northern Hemisphere

Biogeosciences, 4, 715–728, 2007
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-4-715-2007
© Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under
the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.5 License.

  31 Aug 2007

31 Aug 2007

Suitability of quantum cascade laser spectroscopy for CH4 and N2O eddy covariance flux measurements

P. S. Kroon1, A. Hensen1, H. J. J. Jonker2, M. S. Zahniser3, W. H. van 't Veen1, and A. T. Vermeulen1 P. S. Kroon et al.
  • 1Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Department of Air Quality and Climate Change, The Netherlands
  • 2TU Delft, Department of Multi-Scale Physics, Research Group Clouds, Climate and Air Quality, The Netherlands
  • 3Aerodyne Research, Inc., USA

Abstract. A quantum cascade laser spectrometer was evaluated for eddy covariance flux measurements of CH4 and N2O using three months of continuous measurements at a field site. The required criteria for eddy covariance flux measurements including continuity, sampling frequency, precision and stationarity were examined. The system operated continuously at a dairy farm on peat grassland in the Netherlands from 17 August to 6 November 2006. An automatic liquid nitrogen filling system for the infrared detector was employed to provide unattended operation of the system. The electronic sampling frequency was 10 Hz, however, the flow response time was 0.08 s, which corresponds to a bandwidth of 2 Hz. A precision of 2.9 and 0.5 ppb Hz−1/2 was obtained for CH4 and N2O, respectively. Accuracy was assured by frequent calibrations using low and high standard additions. Drifts in the system were compensated by using a 120 s running mean filter. The average CH4 and N2O exchange was 512 ngC m−2 s−1 (2.46 mg m−2 hr−1) and 52 ngN m−2 s−1 (0.29 mg m−2 hr−1). Given that 40% of the total N2O emission was due to a fertilizing event.

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