Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
BG cover
Biogeosciences (BG) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of the interactions between the biological, chemical, and physical processes in terrestrial or extraterrestrial life with the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. The objective of the journal is to cut across the boundaries of established sciences and achieve an interdisciplinary view of these interactions. Experimental, conceptual, and modelling approaches are welcome.


Time from submission to final decision reduced

19 Dec 2017

BG has taken several measures in the hope of shortening the time from submission to final acceptance of a manuscript by a month.

New article processing charges for BG

05 Dec 2017

From 1 January 2018 Biogeosciences (BG) will slightly increase the article processing charges.

Press Release: Deforestation linked to palm oil production is making Indonesia warmer

25 Oct 2017

In the past decades, large areas of forest in Sumatra, Indonesia have been replaced by cash crops like oil palm and rubber plantations. New research, published in BG, shows that these changes in land use increase temperatures in the region. The added warming could affect plants and animals and make parts of the country more vulnerable to wildfires.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

The origin of organic matter in the oldest rocks on Earth is commonly ambiguous (biotic vs. abiotic). This problem culminates in the case of hydrothermal chert veins that contain abundant organic matter. Here we demonstrate a microbial origin of kerogen embedded in a 3.5 Gyr old hydrothermal chert vein. We explain this finding with the large-scale redistribution of biomass by hydrothermal fluids, emphasizing the interplay between biological and abiological processes on the early Earth.

Jan-Peter Duda, Volker Thiel, Thorsten Bauersachs, Helge Mißbach, Manuel Reinhardt, Nadine Schäfer, Martin J. Van Kranendonk, and Joachim Reitner

Using satellite technology and a life-size experiment, we analysed the impact of oyster reefs on mats of microscopic algae that develop within coastal mudflats. We showed that the relationship between microalgae and oysters is not limited to a one-way process where microalgae are a food source to oysters, but that oysters also promote microalgae mats development, presumably by providing nutrients to them. This might yield new insights into coastal ecosystem management.

Caroline Echappé, Pierre Gernez, Vona Méléder, Bruno Jesus, Bruno Cognie, Priscilla Decottignies, Koen Sabbe, and Laurent Barillé

This study provides a demonstration that a biogeochemical/ecosystem/optical computer model which explicitly captures how light is radiated at the surface of the ocean and can be used as a laboratory to explore products (such as Chl a) that are derived from satellite measurements of ocean colour. It explores uncertainties that arise from data input used to derive the algorithms for the products, and issues arising from the interplay between optically important constituents in the ocean.

Stephanie Dutkiewicz, Anna E. Hickman, and Oliver Jahn

Organic carbon processing at the seafloor is studied by geologists to better understand the sedimentary record, by biogeochemists to quantify burial and respiration, by organic geochemists to elucidate compositional changes, and by ecologists to follow carbon transfers within food webs. These disciplinary approaches have their strengths and weaknesses. This award talk provides a synthesis, highlights the role of animals in sediment carbon processing and presents some new concepts.

Jack J. Middelburg

We use the aquatic eddy covariance technique – developed first for benthic O2 flux measurements – right below the air-water interface (~ 4 cm) to determine gas exchange rates and coefficients. This use of the technique is particularly useful in studies of gas exchange and its dynamics and controls. The approach can thus help reduce the recognized problem of large uncertainties linked to gas exchange estimates in traditional aquatic ecosystem studies.

Peter Berg and Michael L. Pace

Publications Copernicus