BG cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Michael
 
Bahn
,
Katja
 
Fennel
,
S.W.A.
 
Naqvi
 &
Anja
 
Rammig
Biogeosciences (BG) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of the interactions between the biological, chemical, and physical processes in terrestrial or extraterrestrial life with the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. The objective of the journal is to cut across the boundaries of established sciences and achieve an interdisciplinary view of these interactions. Experimental, conceptual, and modelling approaches are welcome.
News
Press Release: Oxygen loss in the coastal Baltic Sea is "unprecedentedly severe" 05 Jul 2018

The Baltic Sea is home to some of the world's largest dead zones, areas of oxygen-starved waters where most marine animals can't survive. But while parts of this sea have long suffered from low oxygen levels, a new study by a team in Finland and Germany shows that oxygen loss in coastal areas over the past century is unprecedented in the last 1500 years. The research is published today in BG.

New Journal Impact Factors released 27 Jun 2018

The latest Journal Citation Reports® have been published by Clarivate Analytics.

Extended agreement with the Leibniz Association 03 May 2018

As of 1 May 2018 the centralized payment of article processing charges (APCs) with the Leibniz Association has been extended to 53 Leibniz Institutions participating in the Leibniz Association's Open Access Publishing Fund.

Recent articles

Highlight articles

Biological dinitrogen (N2) fixation provides the major source of new nitrogen (N) to the open ocean. Yet the fate of the diazotroph-derived N (DDN) in the planktonic food web is poorly understood. This study provides the first quantification of DDN release and transfer to phytoplankton, bacteria and zooplankton communities in open ocean waters, under contrasting N2 fixation activity and diversity

Mathieu Caffin, Hugo Berthelot, Véronique Cornet-Barthaux, Aude Barani, and Sophie Bonnet

The temperature sensitivity of soil carbon loss is a critical parameter for projecting future CO2. Isolating soil temperature response in the field is challenging due to difficulties isolating root and microbial respiration. We use a database of direct-warming soil carbon changes to generate a new global temperature sensitivity. Incorporating this into Earth system models reduces projected soil carbon. But it also shows that variation due to this parameter is as high as all other causes.

Katherine Todd-Brown, Bin Zheng, and Thomas W. Crowther

Measurements of the trace gas carbonyl sulfide (OCS) are helpful in quantifying photosynthesis at previously unknowable temporal and spatial scales. While CO2 is both consumed and produced within ecosystems, OCS is mostly produced in the oceans or from specific industries, and destroyed in plant leaves in proportion to CO2. This review summarizes the advancements we have made in the understanding of OCS exchange and applications to vital ecosystem water and carbon cycle questions.

Mary E. Whelan, Sinikka T. Lennartz, Teresa E. Gimeno, Richard Wehr, Georg Wohlfahrt, Yuting Wang, Linda M. J. Kooijmans, Timothy W. Hilton, Sauveur Belviso, Philippe Peylin, Róisín Commane, Wu Sun, Huilin Chen, Le Kuai, Ivan Mammarella, Kadmiel Maseyk, Max Berkelhammer, King-Fai Li, Dan Yakir, Andrew Zumkehr, Yoko Katayama, Jérôme Ogée, Felix M. Spielmann, Florian Kitz, Bharat Rastogi, Jürgen Kesselmeier, Julia Marshall, Kukka-Maaria Erkkilä, Lisa Wingate, Laura K. Meredith, Wei He, Rüdiger Bunk, Thomas Launois, Timo Vesala, Johan A. Schmidt, Cédric G. Fichot, Ulli Seibt, Scott Saleska, Eric S. Saltzman, Stephen A. Montzka, Joseph A. Berry, and J. Elliott Campbell

The Southern Ocean accounts for a large portion of the variability in oceanic CO2 uptake. However, the drivers of these changes are not understood due to a lack of observations. In this study, we used an ensemble of gap-filling methods to estimate surface CO2. We found that winter was a more important driver of longer-term variability driven by changes in wind stress. Summer variability of CO2 was driven primarily by increases in primary production.

Luke Gregor, Schalk Kok, and Pedro M. S. Monteiro

We first report the mercury distribution in the water section across the subpolar and subtropical gyres of the North Atlantic Ocean (GEOTRACES-GA01 transect). It allows the characterisation of various seawater types in terms of mercury content and the quantification of mercury transport associated with the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. It shows the nutrient-like biogeochemical behaviour of mercury in this ocean.

Daniel Cossa, Lars-Eric Heimbürger, Fiz F. Pérez, Maribel I. García-Ibáñez, Jeroen E. Sonke, Hélène Planquette, Pascale Lherminier, Julia Boutorh, Marie Cheize, Jan Lukas Menzel Barraqueta, Rachel Shelley, and Géraldine Sarthou

Publications Copernicus