Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
BG | Volume 16, issue 10
Biogeosciences, 16, 2147–2161, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2147-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 16, 2147–2161, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2147-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 23 May 2019

Research article | 23 May 2019

Kinetics of calcite precipitation by ureolytic bacteria under aerobic and anaerobic conditions

Andrew C. Mitchell et al.

Related subject area

Biogeochemistry: Biomineralization
Technical note: The silicon isotopic composition of choanoflagellates: implications for a mechanistic understanding of isotopic fractionation during biosilicification
Alan Marron, Lucie Cassarino, Jade Hatton, Paul Curnow, and Katharine R. Hendry
Biogeosciences, 16, 4805–4813, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4805-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-4805-2019, 2019
Short summary
Intercomparison of four methods to estimate coral calcification under various environmental conditions
Miguel Gómez Batista, Marc Metian, François Oberhänsli, Simon Pouil, Peter W. Swarzenski, Eric Tambutté, Jean-Pierre Gattuso, Carlos M. Alonso Hernández, and Frédéric Gazeau
Biogeosciences Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-369,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-2019-369, 2019
Revised manuscript accepted for BG
Insights into architecture, growth dynamics, and biomineralization from pulsed Sr-labelled Katelysia rhytiphora shells (Mollusca, Bivalvia)
Laura M. Otter, Oluwatoosin B. A. Agbaje, Matt R. Kilburn, Christoph Lenz, Hadrien Henry, Patrick Trimby, Peter Hoppe, and Dorrit E. Jacob
Biogeosciences, 16, 3439–3455, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-3439-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-3439-2019, 2019
Short summary
Subaqueous speleothems (Hells Bells) formed by the interplay of pelagic redoxcline biogeochemistry and specific hydraulic conditions in the El Zapote sinkhole, Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico
Simon Michael Ritter, Margot Isenbeck-Schröter, Christian Scholz, Frank Keppler, Johannes Gescher, Lukas Klose, Nils Schorndorf, Jerónimo Avilés Olguín, Arturo González-González, and Wolfgang Stinnesbeck
Biogeosciences, 16, 2285–2305, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2285-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2285-2019, 2019
Short summary
Coupled calcium and inorganic carbon uptake suggested by magnesium and sulfur incorporation in foraminiferal calcite
Inge van Dijk, Christine Barras, Lennart Jan de Nooijer, Aurélia Mouret, Esmee Geerken, Shai Oron, and Gert-Jan Reichart
Biogeosciences, 16, 2115–2130, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2115-2019,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-2115-2019, 2019
Short summary

Cited articles

Anbu, P., Kang, C.-H., Shin, Y.-J., and So, J.-S.: Formations of calcium carbonate minerals by bacteria and its multiple applications, SpringerPlus, 5, 250, https://doi.org/10.1186/s40064-016-1869-2, 2016. 
Carslaw, H. S. and Jaeger, J. C.: Conduction of heat in solids, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1959. 
Connolly, J. M., Jackson, B., Rothman, A. P., Klapper, I., and Gerlach, R.: Estimation of a biofilm-specific reaction rate: kinetics of bacterial urea hydrolysis in a biofilm, Biofilms and Microbiomes, 1, 15014, https://doi.org/10.1038/npjbiofilms.2015.14, 2015. 
Cuthbert, M. O., Riley, M. S., Handley-Sidhu, S., Renshaw, J. C., Tobler, D. J., Phoenix, V. R., and Mackay, R.: Controls on the rate of ureolysis and the morphology of carbonate precipitated by S. pasteurii biofilms and limits due to bacterial encapsulation, Ecol. Eng., 41, 32–40, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2012.01.008, 2012. 
Cuthbert, M. O., McMillan, L. A., Handley-Sidhu, S., Riley, M. S., Tobler, D. J., and Phoenix, V. R.: A Field and modeling study of fractured rock permeability reduction using microbially induced calcite precipitation, Environ. Sci. Technol., 47, 13637–13643, https://doi.org/10.1021/es402601g, 2013. 
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Microbially induced carbonate mineral precipitation (MICP) is a natural process that is also being investigated for subsurface engineering applications including radionuclide immobilization and microfracture plugging. We demonstrate that rates of MICP from microbial urea hydrolysis (ureolysis) vary with different bacterial strains, but rates are similar in both oxygenated and oxygen-free conditions. Ureolysis MICP is therefore a viable biotechnology in the predominately oxygen-free subsurface.
Microbially induced carbonate mineral precipitation (MICP) is a natural process that is also...
Citation