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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 15, issue 3
Biogeosciences, 15, 703–719, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-703-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 703–719, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-703-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 05 Feb 2018

Research article | 05 Feb 2018

Peat decomposability in managed organic soils in relation to land use, organic matter composition and temperature

Cédric Bader et al.

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Cited articles

Bader, C., Müller, M., Schulin, R., and Leifeld, J.: Amount and stability of recent and aged plant residues in degrading peatland soils, Soil Biol. Biochem., 109, 167–175, 2017.
Bates, D., Maechler, M., Bolker, B. M., and Walker, S. C.: Fitting Linear Mixed-Effects Models Using lme4, J. Stat. Softw., 67, 1–48, 2015.
Beer, J., Lee, K., Whiticar, M., and Blodau, C.: Geochemical controls on anaerobic organic matter decomposition in a northern peatland, Limnol. Oceanogr., 53, 1393–1407, 2008.
Berglund, K.: Optimal drainage depth of five cultivated organic soils, Swed. J. Agr. Res., 25, 185–196, 1995.
Biasi, C., Rusalimova, O., Meyer, H., Kaiser, C., Wanek, W., Barsukov, P., Junger, H., and Richter, A.: Temperature-dependent shift from labile to recalcitrant carbon sources of arctic heterotrophs, Rapid Commun. Mass Sp., 19, 1401–1408, 2005.
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When drained, peatlands degrade and release large quantities of CO2, thereby contributing to global warming. Do land use or the chemical composition of peat control the rate of that release? We studied 21 sites from the temperate climate zone managed as croplands, grasslands, or forests and found that the CO2 release was high, but only slightly influenced by land use or peat composition. Hence, only keeping peatlands in their natural state prevents them from becoming strong CO2 sources.
When drained, peatlands degrade and release large quantities of CO2, thereby contributing to...
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