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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 14, issue 24 | Copyright
Biogeosciences, 14, 5765-5774, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5765-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 21 Dec 2017

Research article | 21 Dec 2017

Quantification of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in the sea anemone Aiptasia sp. to simulate the sea-to-air flux from coral reefs

Filippo Franchini and Michael Steinke
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Short summary
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a biogenic gas known to many as the 'smell of the sea' but it also stimulates the formation of clouds and cools our planet. Few data are available on its production along tropical coasts and here we quantify DMS in a sea anemone. We then use this information to simulate the release of DMS in coral reefs and highlight that we lack information on DMS-consumption processes if we were to quantify the effect of environmental change on DMS emission from tropical reefs.
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a biogenic gas known to many as the 'smell of the sea' but it also...
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