Biogeosciences, 14, 5765-5774, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5765-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
21 Dec 2017
Quantification of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in the sea anemone Aiptasia sp. to simulate the sea-to-air flux from coral reefs
Filippo Franchini and Michael Steinke
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AC1: 'Response to Referee 1', Michael Steinke, 26 Jun 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
RC2: 'Comments of anonymous referee #2', Anonymous Referee #2, 30 Mar 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Response to Referee 2', Michael Steinke, 26 Jun 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
 
AC3: 'Revised Manuscript', Michael Steinke, 26 Jun 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (29 Jun 2017) by Gerhard Herndl  
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (30 Jun 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Aug 2017) by Gerhard Herndl
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (23 Aug 2017)  
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (24 Sep 2017) by Gerhard Herndl  
AR by Michael Steinke on behalf of the Authors (11 Oct 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
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Short summary
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a biogenic gas known to many as the 'smell of the sea' but it also stimulates the formation of clouds and cools our planet. Few data are available on its production along tropical coasts and here we quantify DMS in a sea anemone. We then use this information to simulate the release of DMS in coral reefs and highlight that we lack information on DMS-consumption processes if we were to quantify the effect of environmental change on DMS emission from tropical reefs.
Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a biogenic gas known to many as the 'smell of the sea' but it also...
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