Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Biogeosciences, 14, 5663-5674, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5663-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
15 Dec 2017
Scotland's forgotten carbon: a national assessment of mid-latitude fjord sedimentary carbon stocks
Craig Smeaton et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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RC1: 'Comments on "Scotland’s Forgotten Carbon: A National Assessment of Mid-Latitude Fjord Sedimentary Carbon Stocks"', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Sep 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Authors Response to Reviewer 1', Craig Smeaton, 16 Oct 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Comments on “Scotland's Forgotten Carbon: A National Assessment of Mid-Latitude Fjord Sedimentary Carbon Stocks” by Smeaton et al.', Anonymous Referee #2, 06 Oct 2017 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Authors Response to Reviewer 2', Craig Smeaton, 16 Oct 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (01 Nov 2017) by Caroline P. Slomp  
AR by Craig Smeaton on behalf of the Authors (02 Nov 2017)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (07 Nov 2017) by Caroline P. Slomp  
CC BY 4.0
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Short summary
Fjord sediments are recognised as hotspots for the burial and long-term storage of carbon. In this study, we use the Scottish fjords as a natural laboratory. Using geophysical and geochemical analysis in combination with upscaling techniques, we have generated the first full national sedimentary C inventory for a fjordic system. The results indicate that the Scottish fjords on a like-for-like basis are more effective as C stores than their terrestrial counterparts, including Scottish peatlands.
Fjord sediments are recognised as hotspots for the burial and long-term storage of carbon. In...
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