Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Volume 14, issue 20
Biogeosciences, 14, 4781–4794, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4781-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 14, 4781–4794, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-4781-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 25 Oct 2017

Research article | 25 Oct 2017

CO2 efflux from soils with seasonal water repellency

Emilia Urbanek and Stefan H. Doerr
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (06 Jun 2017) by Michael Bahn
AR by Emilia Urbanek on behalf of the Authors (06 Jul 2017)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (10 Jul 2017) by Michael Bahn
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (01 Aug 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (11 Aug 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (11 Aug 2017) by Michael Bahn
AR by Emilia Urbanek on behalf of the Authors (31 Aug 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Sep 2017) by Michael Bahn
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Short summary
We studied CO2 emissions from soils that are seasonally water-epellent, and the wetting and water movement is restricted. When CO2 emissions are low soil is consistently water-repellent after a long dry spells, but when water repellency and thus soil moisture are patchy CO2 emission rates are high. The presence of water repellency may therefore increase rather than reduce soil CO2 emissions, which may result in higher soil carbon losses than it was previously anticipated.
We studied CO2 emissions from soils that are seasonally water-epellent, and the wetting and...
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