Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Biogeosciences, 14, 1811-1823, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-1811-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
05 Apr 2017
Export of calcium carbonate corrosive waters from the East Siberian Sea
Leif G. Anderson1, Jörgen Ek2, Ylva Ericson3, Christoph Humborg2,4, Igor Semiletov5,6,7, Marcus Sundbom2, and Adam Ulfsbo1,8 1Department of Marine Sciences, University of Gothenburg, 412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden
2Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
3The University Centre in Svalbard, Pb 156, 9171 Longyearbyen, Norway
4Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
5International Arctic Research Center, University Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
6Pacific Oceanological Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences Far Eastern Branch, Vladivostok 690041, Russia
7The National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia
8Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27704, USA
Abstract. The Siberian shelf seas are areas of extensive biogeochemical transformation of organic matter, both of marine and terrestrial origin. This in combination with brine production from sea ice formation results in a cold bottom water of relative high salinity and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2). Data from the SWERUS-C3 expedition compiled on the icebreaker Oden in July to September 2014 show the distribution of such waters at the outer shelf, as well as their export into the deep central Arctic basins. Very high pCO2 water, up to ∼ 1000 µatm, was observed associated with high nutrients and low oxygen concentrations. Consequently, this water had low saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate down to less than 0.8 for calcite and 0.5 for aragonite. Waters undersaturated in aragonite were also observed in the surface in waters at equilibrium with atmospheric CO2; however, at these conditions the cause of under-saturation was low salinity from river runoff and/or sea ice melt. The calcium carbonate corrosive water was observed all along the continental margin and well out into the deep Makarov and Canada basins at a depth from about 50 m depth in the west to about 150 m in the east. These waters of low aragonite saturation state are traced in historic data to the Canada Basin and in the waters flowing out of the Arctic Ocean north of Greenland and in the western Fram Strait, thus potentially impacting the marine life in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Citation: Anderson, L. G., Ek, J., Ericson, Y., Humborg, C., Semiletov, I., Sundbom, M., and Ulfsbo, A.: Export of calcium carbonate corrosive waters from the East Siberian Sea, Biogeosciences, 14, 1811-1823, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-1811-2017, 2017.
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Short summary
Waters with very high pCO2, nutrients and low oxygen concentrations were observed along the continental margin of the East Siberian Sea and well out into the deep Makarov and Canada basins during the SWERUS-C3 expedition in 2014. This water had a low saturation state with respect to calcium carbonate, down to less than 0.8 for calcite and 0.5 for aragonite, and is traced in historic data to the Canada Basin and in the waters flowing out of the Arctic Ocean in the western Fram Strait.
Waters with very high pCO2, nutrients and low oxygen concentrations were observed along the...
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