Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Volume 13, issue 22
Biogeosciences, 13, 6171-6182, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6171-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Effects of rising CO2 on a Baltic Sea plankton...

Biogeosciences, 13, 6171-6182, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6171-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 15 Nov 2016

Research article | 15 Nov 2016

Ocean acidification challenges copepod phenotypic plasticity

Anu Vehmaa1,2, Anna-Karin Almén2,3, Andreas Brutemark1,2,a, Allanah Paul4, Ulf Riebesell4, Sara Furuhagen5,b, and Jonna Engström-Öst2 Anu Vehmaa et al.
  • 1Tvärminne Zoological Station, University of Helsinki, J.A. Palménin tie 260, 10900 Hanko, Finland
  • 2Novia University of Applied Sciences, Coastal Zone Research Team, Raseborgsvägen 9, 10600 Ekenäs, Finland
  • 3Environmental and Marine Biology, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Åbo Akademi University, Tykistökatu 6, 20500 Turku, Finland
  • 4GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Düsternbrooker Weg 20, 24105 Kiel, Germany
  • 5Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry, Stockholm University, Svante Arrhenius väg 8, 11418, Stockholm, Sweden
  • apresent address: Calluna AB, Torsgatan 30, 11321 Stockholm, Sweden
  • bpresent address: Swedish Chemical Agency, Esplanaden 3A, 17267 Sundbyberg, Sweden

Abstract. Ocean acidification is challenging phenotypic plasticity of individuals and populations. Calanoid copepods (zooplankton) are shown to be fairly plastic against altered pH conditions, and laboratory studies indicate that transgenerational effects are one mechanism behind this plasticity. We studied phenotypic plasticity of the copepod Acartia sp. in the course of a pelagic, large-volume mesocosm study that was conducted to investigate ecosystem and biogeochemical responses to ocean acidification. We measured copepod egg production rate, egg-hatching success, adult female size and adult female antioxidant capacity (ORAC) as a function of acidification (fCO2  ∼ 365–1231µatm) and as a function of quantity and quality of their diet. We used an egg transplant experiment to reveal whether transgenerational effects can alleviate the possible negative effects of ocean acidification on offspring development. We found significant negative effects of ocean acidification on adult female size. In addition, we found signs of a possible threshold at high fCO2, above which adaptive maternal effects cannot alleviate the negative effects of acidification on egg-hatching and nauplii development. We did not find support for the hypothesis that insufficient food quantity (total particulate carbon <55µm) or quality (C:N) weakens the transgenerational effects. However, females with high-ORAC-produced eggs with high hatching success. Overall, these results indicate that Acartia sp. could be affected by projected near-future CO2 levels.

Publications Copernicus
Special issue
Download
Short summary
Ocean acidification is challenging phenotypic plasticity of individuals and populations. We studied phenotypic plasticity of the calanoid copepod Acartia bifilosa in the course of a pelagic, large-volume mesocosm study in the Baltic Sea. We found significant negative effects of ocean acidification on adult female copepod size and egg hatching success. Overall, these results indicate that A. bifilosa could be affected by projected near-future CO2 levels.
Ocean acidification is challenging phenotypic plasticity of individuals and populations. We...
Citation
Share