Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Volume 13, issue 17
Biogeosciences, 13, 5085–5102, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-5085-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: OzFlux: a network for the study of ecosystem carbon and water...

Biogeosciences, 13, 5085–5102, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-5085-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Reviews and syntheses 13 Sep 2016

Reviews and syntheses | 13 Sep 2016

Reviews and syntheses: Australian vegetation phenology: new insights from satellite remote sensing and digital repeat photography

Caitlin E. Moore et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (06 Jul 2016) by Mirco Migliavacca
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (09 Aug 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (22 Aug 2016) by Mirco Migliavacca
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Short summary
Australian vegetation phenology is highly variable due to the diversity of ecosystems on the continent. We explore continental-scale variability using satellite remote sensing by broadly classifying areas as seasonal, non-seasonal, or irregularly seasonal. We also examine ecosystem-scale phenology using phenocams and show that some broadly non-seasonal ecosystems do display phenological variability. Overall, phenocams are useful for understanding ecosystem-scale Australian vegetation phenology.
Australian vegetation phenology is highly variable due to the diversity of ecosystems on the...
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