Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Volume 13, issue 2
Biogeosciences, 13, 415-424, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-415-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 13, 415-424, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-415-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 21 Jan 2016

Research article | 21 Jan 2016

Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

D. L. Kong1,2, J. J. Wang3, P. Kardol4, H. F. Wu5, H. Zeng6, X. B. Deng1, and Y. Deng1 D. L. Kong et al.
  • 1Key Laboratory of Tropical Forest Ecology, Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Mengla, Yunnan, China
  • 2College of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang, China
  • 3Belle W. Baruch Institute of Coastal Ecology & Forest Science, Clemson University, Georgetown, South Carolina, USA
  • 4Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden
  • 5School of Life Sciences, Henan University, Kaifeng, China
  • 6Key Laboratory for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen, China

Abstract. Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis <247µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Our study showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. The findings support our hypothesis that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.
Our study showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an...
Citation
Share