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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 12
Biogeosciences, 13, 3549–3571, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-3549-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 13, 3549–3571, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-3549-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 17 Jun 2016

Research article | 17 Jun 2016

Ecological controls on N2O emission in surface litter and near-surface soil of a managed grassland: modelling and measurements

Robert F. Grant et al.
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Cited articles  
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The magnitude of N2O emissions from managed grasslands depends on weather and on harvesting and fertilizer practices. Modelling provides a means to predict these emissions under diverse weather and management types. In this modelling study, we show that N2O emissions depend on how weather affects temperatures and water contents of surface litter and near-surface soil. N2O emissions modelled from the grassland were increased by suboptimal harvesting practices, fertilizer timing and soil properties.
The magnitude of N2O emissions from managed grasslands depends on weather and on harvesting and...
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