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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 18
Biogeosciences, 12, 5563–5566, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-5563-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 12, 5563–5566, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-5563-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Peer-reviewed comment 30 Sep 2015

Peer-reviewed comment | 30 Sep 2015

Sharp ecotones spark sharp ideas: comment on "Structural, physiognomic and above-ground biomass variation in savanna–forest transition zones on three continents – how different are co-occurring savanna and forest formations?" by Veenendaal et al. (2015)

A. Staal1 and B. M. Flores1,2,3 A. Staal and B. M. Flores
  • 1Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen, the Netherlands
  • 2Resource Ecology Group, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen, the Netherlands
  • 3Department of Ecology, Center for Biosciences, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal, RN, Brazil
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Remote sensing studies indicate that tropical forest and savanna can be alternative stable states maintained by a feedback between tree cover and fire. Veenendaal et al. (2015) attempted to refute this hypothesis with an extensive field study of the vegetation structure and soil conditions at forest–savanna transition zones. With a re-analysis of their data and a conceptual model, we show that in fact the results agree with the idea of forest–savanna bistability.
Remote sensing studies indicate that tropical forest and savanna can be alternative stable...
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