Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.753 IF 3.753
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 4.644 IF 5-year
    4.644
  • SNIP value: 1.376 SNIP 1.376
  • IPP value: 4.067 IPP 4.067
  • SJR value: 2.451 SJR 2.451
  • h5-index value: 57 h5-index 57
BG cover
Co-editors-in-chief:
Michael
 
Bahn
Katja
 
Fennel
Jürgen
 
Kesselmeier
S.W.A.
 
Naqvi
 &
Albrecht
 
Neftel

Biogeosciences (BG) is an international scientific journal dedicated to the publication and discussion of research articles, short communications, and review papers on all aspects of the interactions between the biological, chemical, and physical processes in terrestrial or extraterrestrial life with the geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere. The objective of the journal is to cut across the boundaries of established sciences and achieve an interdisciplinary view of these interactions. Experimental, conceptual, and modelling approaches are welcome.

News

Website relaunch

09 Mar 2015

The BG website has been given a new look, and the navigation has been adjusted.
Further details:

TU Delft and Copernicus Publications cooperate in supporting open access

22 Jan 2015

In order to further promote open access, the TU Delft Library has transferred a budget to Copernicus to be used by its scientists in 2015.

Central billing of APCs for TUM authors

09 Jan 2015

Copernicus Publications and the University Library of the Technical University Munich (TUM) have agreed on central billing of article processing charges.

Recent articles


Highlight articles

Here we investigate how ecosystem carbon stocks vary with elevation shifting from the closed forest to open alpine tundra, in the mountains of southern Norway. Above-ground carbon stocks decreased with elevation, with a clear breakpoint at the forest line, while the organic horizon soil carbon stocks increased linearly with elevation. Overall, ecosystem carbon stocks increased with elevation above the treeline and decreased with elevation below, demonstrating the importance of the treeline.

J. D. M. Speed, V. Martinsen, A. J. Hester, Ø. Holand, J. Mulder, A. Mysterud, and G. Austrheim

We investigated the origin and mechanisms of the natural iron fertilization that sustains a phytoplankton bloom downstream of the Kerguelen Islands. We used radium isotopes to trace the fate of shelf waters that may transport iron and other micronutrients towards offshore waters. We show that shelf waters are rapidly transferred offshore and may be transported across the polar front (PF). The PF may thus not be a strong physical barrier for chemical elements released by the shelf sediments.

V. Sanial, P. van Beek, B. Lansard, M. Souhaut, E. Kestenare, F. d'Ovidio, M. Zhou, and S. Blain

Production of calcium carbonate by coral reefs is important in the global carbon cycle. Using a global framework we evaluate four models of reef calcification against observed values. The temperature-only model showed significant skill in reproducing coral calcification rates. The absence of any predictive power for whole reef systems highlights the importance of coral cover and the need for an ecosystem modelling approach accounting for population dynamics in terms of mortality and recruitment.

N. S. Jones, A. Ridgwell, and E. J. Hendy

This paper introduces a novel rainfall reduction experiment to investigate drought effects on soil-forest-understory-ecosystems. An annual drought with a return period of 40 years was imposed, while other ecosystem variables (humidity, air & soil temperature) remained unaffected. The first year of drought showed considerable changes in soil moisture dynamics, which affected leaf stomatal conductance of understory species as well as evapotranspiration rates of the forest understory ecosystem.

K. F. Gimbel, K. Felsmann, M. Baudis, H. Puhlmann, A. Gessler, H. Bruelheide, Z. Kayler, R. H. Ellerbrock, A. Ulrich, E. Welk, and M. Weiler

Different observational-based estimates of CO2 uptake and resulting acidification of the Mediterranean Sea vary widely. A new study finds that even the smallest of those are an upper limit because the approach used assumes air-sea CO2 equilibrium. Then with a lower limit from new fine-scale numerical model simulations, the authors bracket Mediterranean Sea CO2 uptake and acidification rates. They conclude that its rate of surface acidifcation is much like that for typical ocean waters.

J. Palmiéri, J. C. Orr, J.-C. Dutay, K. Béranger, A. Schneider, J. Beuvier, and S. Somot

Publications Copernicus