Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
BG | Volume 16, issue 19
Biogeosciences, 16, 3929–3939, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-3929-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 16, 3929–3939, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-16-3929-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 11 Oct 2019

Research article | 11 Oct 2019

Spatial changes in soil stable isotopic composition in response to carrion decomposition

Sarah W. Keenan et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (31 Aug 2019) by Silvio Pantoja
AR by Sarah Keenan on behalf of the Authors (06 Sep 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (14 Sep 2019) by Silvio Pantoja
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Short summary
Decaying animals perturb soil biogeochemical cycles. Stable δ15N composition, which reflects the sum of all biogeochemical processes, increases during decay and persists for years. Enrichment following beaver decay persisted after at least 1 year, and was evident up to 10 cm depth and 60 cm from the decaying animals, beyond where soils were visibly impacted by decomposition. Nutrients sourced from decaying animals represent an integral and long–lived component of nitrogen cycling in soils.
Decaying animals perturb soil biogeochemical cycles. Stable δ15N composition, which reflects...
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