Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
BG | Volume 15, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 15, 7235–7242, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-7235-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 7235–7242, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-7235-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Dec 2018

Research article | 05 Dec 2018

Artificial radionuclides in neon flying squid from the northwestern Pacific in 2011 following the Fukushima accident

Wen Yu et al.
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (07 Aug 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (31 Aug 2018)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (31 Aug 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (17 Sep 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (11 Oct 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (25 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (06 Nov 2018) by Manmohan Sarin
AR by Wen Yu on behalf of the Authors (09 Nov 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
To better understand the impact of the Fukushima accident on commercial marine species, neon flying squid samples obtained from the NW Pacific in Nov 2011 were analyzed for a range of radionuclides. Elevated levels of Cs-134 and Ag-110m from the Fukushima accident were found in the samples, with an extremely high concentration ratio for Ag-110m. However, the radiological dose for squid living in the study area, and for human consumers of these squid, was far below the recommended dose limits.
To better understand the impact of the Fukushima accident on commercial marine species, neon...
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