Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Volume 15, issue 3
Biogeosciences, 15, 703–719, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-703-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 703–719, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-703-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 05 Feb 2018

Research article | 05 Feb 2018

Peat decomposability in managed organic soils in relation to land use, organic matter composition and temperature

Cédric Bader et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (17 Aug 2017) by Jens-Arne Subke
AR by Jens Leifeld on behalf of the Authors (26 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Oct 2017) by Jens-Arne Subke
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (13 Dec 2017)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (13 Dec 2017) by Jens-Arne Subke
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
When drained, peatlands degrade and release large quantities of CO2, thereby contributing to global warming. Do land use or the chemical composition of peat control the rate of that release? We studied 21 sites from the temperate climate zone managed as croplands, grasslands, or forests and found that the CO2 release was high, but only slightly influenced by land use or peat composition. Hence, only keeping peatlands in their natural state prevents them from becoming strong CO2 sources.
When drained, peatlands degrade and release large quantities of CO2, thereby contributing to...
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