Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
BG | Volume 15, issue 21
Biogeosciences, 15, 6621–6635, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-6621-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 6621–6635, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-6621-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 08 Nov 2018

Research article | 08 Nov 2018

Impacts of temperature and soil characteristics on methane production and oxidation in Arctic tundra

Jianqiu Zheng et al.
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (08 Jun 2018) by Minhan Dai
AR by David Graham on behalf of the Authors (16 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Aug 2018) by Minhan Dai
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (06 Sep 2018)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (17 Sep 2018)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (23 Sep 2018) by Minhan Dai
AR by David Graham on behalf of the Authors (29 Sep 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (25 Oct 2018) by Minhan Dai
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Arctic soils store vast amounts of frozen carbon that will thaw, fueling microbes that produce carbon dioxide and methane greenhouse gases. We compared methane producing and oxidizing activities in incubated soils and permafrost of Arctic tundra to improve estimates of net emissions. The methane oxidation profile in these soils differs from temperate ecosystems: maximum methane oxidation potential occurs in suboxic soils and permafrost layers, close to the methanogens that produce methane.
Arctic soils store vast amounts of frozen carbon that will thaw, fueling microbes that produce...
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