Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 15, issue 14
Biogeosciences, 15, 4317–4331, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4317-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 4317–4331, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4317-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 17 Jul 2018

Research article | 17 Jul 2018

The impacts of recent drought on fire, forest loss, and regional smoke emissions in lowland Bolivia

Joshua P. Heyer et al.

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Short summary
A variety of data were explored to better understand relationships among climate, fire, smoke emissions, and human land use in lowland Bolivia. Paleosedimentary work and modern fire records have linked drought to fire in the southern Amazon. From 2000 to 2015, our results indicate drought was the dominant control on wildfire in lowland Bolivia and in Noel Kempff Mercado National Park. Note that fire was most common in the Cerrado and seasonally inundated wetland biomes.
A variety of data were explored to better understand relationships among climate, fire, smoke...
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