Volume 15, issue 13 | Copyright
Biogeosciences, 15, 3975-4001, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3975-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 05 Jul 2018

Research article | 05 Jul 2018

A 1500-year multiproxy record of coastal hypoxia from the northern Baltic Sea indicates unprecedented deoxygenation over the 20th century

Sami A. Jokinen et al.
Download
Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (10 Apr 2018) by S.W.A. Naqvi
AR by Sami Jokinen on behalf of the Authors (07 May 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (11 May 2018) by S.W.A. Naqvi
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (25 May 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (26 May 2018) by S.W.A. Naqvi
AR by Sami Jokinen on behalf of the Authors (01 Jun 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (06 Jun 2018) by S.W.A. Naqvi
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Oxygen deficiency is a major environmental problem deteriorating seafloor habitats especially in the coastal ocean with large human impact. Here we apply a wide set of chemical and physical analyses to a 1500-year long sediment record and show that, although long-term climate variability has modulated seafloor oxygenation in the coastal northern Baltic Sea, the oxygen loss over the 20th century is unprecedentedly severe, emphasizing the need to reduce anthropogenic nutrient input in the future.
Oxygen deficiency is a major environmental problem deteriorating seafloor habitats especially in...
Citation
Share