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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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BG | Volume 15, issue 10
Biogeosciences, 15, 3143–3167, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3143-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 15, 3143–3167, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-3143-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 25 May 2018

Research article | 25 May 2018

Landscape analysis of soil methane flux across complex terrain

Kendra E. Kaiser et al.
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Cited articles  
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Soil methane (CH4) fluxes are highly variable across natural landscapes, yet research on the variability of fluxes in unsaturated soils has not been as prevalent as in saturated portions of the landscape. In this study we measured CH4 fluxes and environmental variables across a small mountainous watershed in central Montana. We found that CH4 consumption in upland soils increased as the watershed became more dry and that a combination of terrain metrics can represent 47 % of the variability.
Soil methane (CH4) fluxes are highly variable across natural landscapes, yet research on the...
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