Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
BG | Volume 15, issue 8
Biogeosciences, 15, 2393–2410, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-2393-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: The Ocean in a High-CO2 World IV

Biogeosciences, 15, 2393–2410, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-2393-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 20 Apr 2018

Research article | 20 Apr 2018

Ocean acidification changes the structure of an Antarctic coastal protistan community

Alyce M. Hancock et al.
Data sets

Ocean acidification changes the structure of an Antarctic coastal protistan community A. M. Hancock, A. T. Davidson, J. McKinlay, A. McMinn, K. Schulz, and D. van den Enden https://doi.org/10.4225/15/592b83a5c7506

Environmental data for Davis 14/15 ocean acidification minicosm experiment S. L. Deppeler, A. T. Davidson, and K. Schulz https://doi.org/10.4225/15/599a7dfe9470

Model code and software

Ocean acidification changes the structure of an Antarctic coastal protistan community A. M. Hancock, A. T. Davidson, J. McKinlay, A. McMinn, K. Schulz, and D. van den Enden https://data.aad.gov.au/metadata/records/AAS_4026_Microscopy_Multivariate_Statistics_Rcode

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Short summary
Absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) realized by humans is decreasing the ocean pH (ocean acidification). Single-celled organisms (microbes) support the Antarctic ecosystem, yet little is known about their sensitivity to ocean acidification. This study shows a shift in a natural Antarctic microbial community, with CO2 levels exceeding 634 μatm changing the community composition and favouring small cells. This would have significant flow effects for Antarctic food webs and elemental cycles.
Absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) realized by humans is decreasing the ocean pH (ocean...
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