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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 14, issue 24
Biogeosciences, 14, 5727-5739, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5727-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 14, 5727-5739, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-5727-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 20 Dec 2017

Research article | 20 Dec 2017

Low pCO2 under sea-ice melt in the Canada Basin of the western Arctic Ocean

Naohiro Kosugi et al.
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Short summary
Recent variation in air–sea CO2 flux in the Arctic Ocean is focused. In order to understand the relation between sea ice retreat and CO2 chemistry, we conducted hydrographic observations in the Arctic Ocean in 2013. There were relatively high pCO2 surface layer and low pCO2 subsurface layer in the Canada Basin. The former was due to near-equilibration with the atmosphere and the latter primary production. Both were unlikely mixed by disturbance as large sea-ice melt formed strong stratification.
Recent variation in air–sea CO2 flux in the Arctic Ocean is focused. In order to understand the...
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