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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 14, issue 17
Biogeosciences, 14, 3927–3935, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-3927-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: The Ocean in a High-CO2 World IV

Biogeosciences, 14, 3927–3935, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-14-3927-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Reviews and syntheses 08 Sep 2017

Reviews and syntheses | 08 Sep 2017

Reviews and syntheses: Ice acidification, the effects of ocean acidification on sea ice microbial communities

Andrew McMinn
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Short summary
Dissolved carbon dioxide levels in the oceans are rising and this is causing a drop in the pH (ocean acidification). This potentially effects all marine organisms, including those in polar regions. Sea ice algae are naturally exposed to a wide range of pH and CO2 concentrations, particularly during the ice formation and melting cycles. However, all studies so far have shown ice algae to be quite resilient to change. This includes the effects of co-stressors such as light, iron and temperature.
Dissolved carbon dioxide levels in the oceans are rising and this is causing a drop in the pH...
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