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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 13, 6471-6486, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6471-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 13, 6471-6486, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6471-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 12 Dec 2016

Research article | 12 Dec 2016

The growth of shrubs on high Arctic tundra at Bylot Island: impact on snow physical properties and permafrost thermal regime

Florent Domine et al.
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (15 Jun 2016) by Ulrike Seibt
AR by Florent Dominé on behalf of the Authors (17 Jun 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Jun 2016) by Ulrike Seibt
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (04 Nov 2016)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (08 Nov 2016) by Ulrike Seibt
AR by Florent Dominé on behalf of the Authors (17 Nov 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Nov 2016) by Ulrike Seibt
AR by Florent Dominé on behalf of the Authors (24 Nov 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Warming-induced shrub growth in the Arctic traps snow and modifies snow properties, hence the permafrost thermal regime. In the Canadian high Arctic, we measured snow physical properties in the presence and absence of willow shrubs (Salix richardsonii). Shrubs dramatically reduce snow density and thermal conductivity, seriously limiting soil winter cooling. Simulations taking into account only winter changes show that shrub growth leads to a ground winter warming of up to 13 °C.
Warming-induced shrub growth in the Arctic traps snow and modifies snow properties, hence the...
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