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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 13, 6405–6417, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6405-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 13, 6405–6417, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-6405-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 30 Nov 2016

Research article | 30 Nov 2016

Archive of bacterial community in anhydrite crystals from a deep-sea basin provides evidence of past oil-spilling in a benthic environment in the Red Sea

Yong Wang et al.
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Short summary
Mild eruption of hydrothermal solutions on deep-sea benthic floor can produce anhydrite crystal layers, where microbes are trapped and preserved for a long period of time. These embedded original inhabitants will be biomarkers for the environment when the hydrothermal eruption occurred. This study discovered a thick anhydrite layer in a deep-sea brine pool in the Red Sea. Oil-degrading bacteria were revealed in the crystals with genomic and microscopic evidence.
Mild eruption of hydrothermal solutions on deep-sea benthic floor can produce anhydrite crystal...
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