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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 17 | Copyright
Biogeosciences, 13, 4915-4926, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4915-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 07 Sep 2016

Research article | 07 Sep 2016

Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

Oscar Serrano et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (24 Apr 2016) by Gwenaël Abril
AR by O. Serrano on behalf of the Authors (06 Jun 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Jun 2016) by Gwenaël Abril
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (30 Jun 2016)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (12 Jul 2016) by Gwenaël Abril
AR by O. Serrano on behalf of the Authors (05 Aug 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (10 Aug 2016) by Gwenaël Abril
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Short summary
We explored the relationship between organic carbon and mud (i.e. silt and clay) contents in seagrass ecosystems to address whether mud can be used to predict soil C content, thereby enabling robust scaling up exercises at a low cost as part of blue carbon stock assessments. We show that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, but it can be used to estimate soil Corg content when low biomass seagrass species (i.e. Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present.
We explored the relationship between organic carbon and mud (i.e. silt and clay) contents in...
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