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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Volume 13, issue 12
Biogeosciences, 13, 3619–3633, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-3619-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 13, 3619–3633, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-3619-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 21 Jun 2016

Research article | 21 Jun 2016

No-tillage lessens soil CO2 emissions the most under arid and sandy soil conditions: results from a meta-analysis

Khatab Abdalla et al.
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Short summary
Discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and environmental controls. Results from a meta-analysis using 174 paired observations comparing CO2 emissions over entire seasons or years from tilled (untilled) soils across different climates, crop types and soil conditions show that on average: (1) tilled soils emit 21 % more CO2 than untilled soils; (2) the difference increase to 29 % in sandy soils from arid climates with low soil organic carbon content.
Discrepancies exist on the impact of tillage on soil CO2 emissions and on the main soil and...
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