Volume 13, issue 10 | Copyright
Biogeosciences, 13, 3109-3129, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-3109-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 30 May 2016

Research article | 30 May 2016

Robotic observations of high wintertime carbon export in California coastal waters

James K. B. Bishop et al.
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Is the ocean’s biological carbon pump stable or changing? The Carbon Flux Explorer (CFE), capable of year-long missions without tending ships, was invented to address this question. The CFE dives to 1000 m depths and drifts with currents to optically measure the downward flux of sinking carbon using imaging methods. During wintertime tests in California coastal waters, the CFE observed fluxes ∼10 times higher than previously reported. Traditional approaches have undersampled > 1 mm aggregates.
Is the ocean’s biological carbon pump stable or changing? The Carbon Flux Explorer (CFE),...
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