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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 13, issue 4 | Copyright
Biogeosciences, 13, 1145-1147, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-1145-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Ideas and perspectives 25 Feb 2016

Ideas and perspectives | 25 Feb 2016

All-clear for gourmets: truffles not radioactive

U. Büntgen1,2,3, M. Jäggi4, U. Stobbe5, W. Tegel6, L. Sproll5, J. Eikenberg4, and S. Egli1 U. Büntgen et al.
  • 1Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL, Birmensdorf, Switzerland
  • 2Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research OCCR, Bern, Switzerland
  • 3Global Change Research Centre AS CR, Brno, Czech Republic
  • 4Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, Villigen, Switzerland
  • 5Deutsche Trüffelbäume, Radolfzell, Germany
  • 6Institute of Forest Sciences IWW, Freiburg University, Freiburg, Germany

Abstract. Although ranging among the most expensive gourmet foods, it remains unclear whether Burgundy truffles (Tuber aestivum) accumulate radioactivity at a harmful level comparable to other fungal species. Here, we measure the 137Cs in 82 T. aestivum fruit bodies from Switzerland, Germany, France, Italy, and Hungary. All tested specimens reveal insignificant radiocaesium concentrations, thus providing an all-clear for many truffle hunters and cultivators in large parts of Europe as well as the subsequent chain of dealers and customers from around the world. Our results are particularly relevant in the light of ongoing efforts to cultivate Burgundy truffles, as well as the fact that several forest ecosystems are still highly contaminated with 137Cs, for which mushrooms are one of the main pathways to human diets.

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Although ranging among the most expensive gourmet foods, it remains unclear whether truffles accumulate radioactivity at a harmful level comparable to other fungi. Insignificant radiocaesium concentrations in specimens from Switzerland, Germany, France, Italy, and Hungary provide an all-clear for truffle hunters and cultivators in Europe as well as dealers and customers from around the world.
Although ranging among the most expensive gourmet foods, it remains unclear whether truffles...
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