Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 12, 7057–7070, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-7057-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 12, 7057–7070, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-7057-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 07 Dec 2015

Research article | 07 Dec 2015

Carbon dynamics in boreal peatlands of the Yenisey region, western Siberia

E. D. Schulze1, E. Lapshina2, I. Filippov2, I. Kuhlmann1, and D. Mollicone1,3 E. D. Schulze et al.
  • 1Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, P.O. Box 100164, 07701 Jena, Germany
  • 2Yugra State University, Khanty-Mansiysk, Khanty-Mansiysk Autonomous District, 628012 Russia
  • 3Dept. of Forestry, FAO, Viale delle Terme di Caracalla, 00153 Rome, Italy

Abstract. Here we investigate the vegetation history and peat accumulation at the eastern boarder of the West Siberian Plain, near the Yenisey River, south of permafrost. In this region, peat started to accumulate 15 000 years ago as gyttja of shallow lakes in ancient river valleys. This peat is older than previously reported, mainly due to separating particulate organic carbon (POC) from dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which was 1900–6500 years younger than POC. The probability of finding peat layers older than 12 000 years is about 2 %. Peat accumulated as fen peat at a constant rate of 0.2 mm yr−1 and 0.01 kg C m−2 yr−1. The accumulation was higher in ancient river valley environments. Over the last 2000 years these bogs changed into Sphagnum mires which have accumulated up to about 0.1 kg C m−2 yr−1 until present.

The long-lasting fen stage, which makes the Yenisey bogs distinct from the western Siberian bogs, is discussed as a consequence of the local hydrology. The high accumulation rate of peat in unfrozen mires is taken as an indication that thawing of permafrost peat may also change northern peatlands into long-lasting carbon sinks.

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At the eastern border of the West Siberian Plain, south of permafrost, peat started to accumulate 15000 years ago. Peat accumulated as fen peat at a constant rate of 0.2 mm yr-1 and 0.01 kgC m-2 yr-1. Over the last 2000 years, the bogs have changed into Sphagnum mires, accumulating about 0.1 kgC m-2 yr-1 until the present. The high accumulation rate of peat in unfrozen mires indicates that thawing of permafrost peat may change northern peatlands into long-lasting carbon sinks.
At the eastern border of the West Siberian Plain, south of permafrost, peat started to...
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