Volume 12, issue 23 | Copyright

Special issue: Freshwater ecosystems in changing permafrost landscapes

Biogeosciences, 12, 6915-6930, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6915-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 03 Dec 2015

Research article | 03 Dec 2015

Biodegradability of dissolved organic carbon in permafrost soils and aquatic systems: a meta-analysis

J. E. Vonk et al.
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We found that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in arctic soils and aquatic systems is increasingly degradable with increasing permafrost extent. Also, DOC seems less degradable when moving down the fluvial network in continuous permafrost regions, i.e. from streams to large rivers, suggesting that highly bioavailable DOC is lost in headwater streams. We also recommend a standardized DOC incubation protocol to facilitate future comparison on processing and transport of DOC in a changing Arctic.
We found that dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in arctic soils and aquatic systems is increasingly...
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