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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 23
Biogeosciences, 12, 6853–6868, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6853-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: Hotspots of greenhouse emissions from terrestrial ecosystems...

Biogeosciences, 12, 6853–6868, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-6853-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 01 Dec 2015

Research article | 01 Dec 2015

Impacts of climate and reclamation on temporal variations in CH4 emissions from different wetlands in China: from 1950 to 2010

T. Li1, W. Zhang1, Q. Zhang1, Y. Lu2, G. Wang1, Z. Niu3, M. Raivonen4, and T. Vesala4,5 T. Li et al.
  • 1LAPC, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
  • 2Anhui Climate Center, Hefei 230031, China
  • 3State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, Jointly Sponsored by Institute of Remote Sensing Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100101, China
  • 4Department of Physics, P.O. Box 48, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland
  • 5Department of Forest Sciences, P.O. Box 27, 00014 University of Helsinki, Finland

Abstract. Natural wetlands are among the most important sources of atmospheric methane and thus important for better understanding the long-term temporal variations in the atmospheric methane concentration. During the last 60 years, wetlands have experienced extensive conversion and impacts from climate warming which might result in complicated temporal and spatial variations in the changes of the wetland methane emissions. In this paper, we present a modeling framework, integrating CH4MODwetland, TOPMODEL, and TEM models, to analyze the temporal and spatial variations in CH4 emissions from natural wetlands (including inland marshes/swamps, coastal wetlands, lakes, and rivers) in China. Our analysis revealed a total increase of 25.5 %, averaging 0.52 g m−2 per decade, in the national CH4 fluxes from 1950 to 2010, which was mainly induced by climate warming. Larger CH4 flux increases occurred in northeastern, northern, and northwestern China, where there have been higher temperature rises. However, decreases in precipitation due to climate warming offset the increment of CH4 fluxes in these regions. The CH4 fluxes from the wetland on the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau exhibited the lowest CH4 increase (0.17 g m−2 per decade). Although climate warming has accelerated CH4 fluxes, the total amount of national CH4 emissions decreased by approximately 2.35 Tg (1.91–2.81 Tg), i.e., from 4.50 Tg in the early 1950s to 2.15 Tg in the late 2000s, due to the wetland loss totalling 17.0 million ha. Of this reduction, 0.26 Tg (0.24–0.28 Tg) was derived from lakes and rivers, 0.16 Tg (0.13–0.20 Tg) from coastal wetlands, and 1.92 Tg (1.54–2.33 Tg) from inland wetlands. Spatially, northeastern China contributed the most to the total reduction, with a loss of 1.68 Tg. The wetland CH4 emissions reduced by more than half in most regions in China except for the Qinghai–Tibet Plateau, where the CH4 decrease was only 23.3 %.

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Natural wetlands in China have experienced extensive conversion and climate warming, which makes the estimation of methane emission from wetlands highly uncertain. In this paper, we simulated an increase of 25.5% in national CH4 fluxes from 1950 to 2010, which was mainly induced by climate warming. Although climate warming has accelerated CH4 fluxes, the total amount of national CH4 emissions decreased by approximately 2.35 Tg (1.91-2.81 Tg), due to a large wetland loss of 17.0 million ha.
Natural wetlands in China have experienced extensive conversion and climate warming, which makes...
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