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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 14
Biogeosciences, 12, 4497–4508, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-4497-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 12, 4497–4508, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-4497-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 30 Jul 2015

Research article | 30 Jul 2015

The mechanisms of North Atlantic CO2 uptake in a large Earth System Model ensemble

P. R. Halloran et al.

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Cited articles

Bennington, V., McKinley, G. A., Dutkiewicz, S., and Ulman, D.: What does chlorophyll variability tell us about export and air-sea CO2 flux variability in the North Atlantic?, Global Biogeochem Cy., 23, https://doi.org/10.1029/2008GB003241, 2009.
Booth, B. B. B., Jones, C. D., Collins, M., Totterdell, I. J., Cox, P. M., Sitch, S., Huntingford, C., Betts, R. A., Harris, G. R., and Lloyd, J.: High sensitivity of future global warming to land carbon cycle processes, Environ. Res. Lett., 7, 024002, https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/7/2/024002, 2012.
Corbière, A., Metzl, N., Reverdin, G., Brunet, C., and Takahashi, A.: Interannual and decadal variability of the oceanic carbon sink in the North Atlantic subpolar gyre, Tellus B, 59, 168–178, https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0889.2006.00232.x, 2007.
Cox, P., Betts, R., Jones, C., Spall, S., and Totterdell, I.: Acceleration of global warming due to carbon-cycle feedbacks in a coupled climate model, Nature, 408, 184–187, https://doi.org/10.1038/35041539, 2000.
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The oceans currently take up around a quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by human activity. While stored in the ocean, this CO2 is not causing global warming. Here we explore high latitude North Atlantic CO2 uptake across a set of climate model simulations, and find that the models show a peak in ocean CO2 uptake around the middle of the century after which time CO2 uptake begins to decline. We identify the causes of this long-term change and interannual variability in the models.
The oceans currently take up around a quarter of the carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by human...
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