Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Biogeosciences, 12, 3551-3565, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-3551-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
09 Jun 2015
A 50 % increase in the mass of terrestrial particles delivered by the Mackenzie River into the Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic Ocean) over the last 10 years
D. Doxaran et al.
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Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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SC C5: 'review by D.G.Bowers', David George Bowers, 14 Jan 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
RC C11: 'Review', David George Bowers, 16 Jan 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
AC C854: 'Answer to first reviewer's main comments', David Doxaran, 27 Mar 2015 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC C236: 'Review Comments', Anonymous Referee #2, 17 Feb 2015 Printer-friendly Version 
AC C860: 'Answers to second reviewer's comments', David Doxaran, 27 Mar 2015 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Peer review completion
AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by David Doxaran on behalf of the Authors (27 Apr 2015)  Author's response  Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (28 Apr 2015) by Emmanuel Boss  
AR by David Doxaran on behalf of the Authors (28 Apr 2015)  Author's response  Manuscript
CC BY 4.0
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Eleven years (2003-2013) of satellite data were processed to observe the variations in suspended particulate matter concentrations at the mouth of the Mackenzie River and estimate the fluxes exported into the Canadian Arctic Ocean. Results show that these concentrations at the river mouth, in the delta zone and in the river plume have increased by 46%, 71% and 33%, respectively, since 2003. This corresponds to a more than 50% increase in particulate export from the river into the Beaufort Sea.
Eleven years (2003-2013) of satellite data were processed to observe the variations in suspended...
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