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Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 12, issue 1
Biogeosciences, 12, 257–268, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-257-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 12, 257–268, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-257-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 15 Jan 2015

Research article | 15 Jan 2015

Emissions from prescribed fires in temperate forest in south-east Australia: implications for carbon accounting

M. Possell et al.
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Cited articles  
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Emissions from fires are estimated as products of fuel load, burning efficiency, area burnt and emission factors for compounds of interest. Uncertainties in these variables lead to a wide range of estimates. We demonstrate that the probability of estimating true emissions declines strongly as the amount of information available declines. Including coarse woody debris in estimates increased uncertainty in calculations because it was the most variable contributor to fuel load.
Emissions from fires are estimated as products of fuel load, burning efficiency, area burnt and...
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