Journal cover Journal topic
Biogeosciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic
Volume 12, issue 7
Biogeosciences, 12, 2227–2245, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-2227-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Biogeosciences, 12, 2227–2245, 2015
https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-12-2227-2015
© Author(s) 2015. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 15 Apr 2015

Research article | 15 Apr 2015

Organic-matter quality of deep permafrost carbon – a study from Arctic Siberia

J. Strauss et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Jens Strauss on behalf of the Authors (13 Feb 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Mar 2015) by Daniel Obrist
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (09 Mar 2015)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (10 Mar 2015) by Daniel Obrist
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (17 Mar 2015)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (19 Mar 2015) by Daniel Obrist
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Climatic warming is affecting permafrost, including decomposition of organic matter (OM). However, quantitative data for the quality of OM and its availability for decomposition is limited. We analyzed the quality of OM in late Pleistocene (Yedoma) and Holocene (thermokarst) deposits. A lack of depth trends reveals a constant quality of OM showing that permafrost acts like a freezer, preserving OM quality. This OM will be susceptible to decomposition under climatic warming.
Climatic warming is affecting permafrost, including decomposition of organic matter (OM)....
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