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Biogeosciences, 8, 637-651, 2011
www.biogeosciences.net/8/637/2011/
doi:10.5194/bg-8-637-2011
© Author(s) 2011. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
First observations of global and seasonal terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence from space
J. Joiner1, Y. Yoshida2, A. P. Vasilkov2, Y. Yoshida3, L. A. Corp4, and E. M. Middleton1
1NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA
2Science Systems and Applications Inc., 10210 Greenbelt, Rd., Ste 400, Lanham, MD, USA
3National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Tsukuba-City, Ibaraki, Japan
4Sigma Space Corp., 4600 Forbes Blvd., Lanham, MD, USA

Abstract. Remote sensing of terrestrial vegetation fluorescence from space is of interest because it can potentially provide global coverage of the functional status of vegetation. For example, fluorescence observations may provide a means to detect vegetation stress before chlorophyll reductions take place. Although there have been many measurements of fluorescence from ground- and airborne-based instruments, there has been scant information available from satellites. In this work, we use high-spectral resolution data from the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation – Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) on the Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) that is in a sun-synchronous orbit with an equator crossing time near 13:00 LT. We use filling-in of the potassium (K) I solar Fraunhofer line near 770 nm to derive chlorophyll fluorescence and related parameters such as the fluorescence yield at that wavelength. We map these parameters globally for two months (July and December 2009) and show a full seasonal cycle for several different locations, including two in the Amazonia region. We also compare the derived fluorescence information with that provided by the MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI). These comparisons show that for several areas these two indices exhibit different seasonality and/or relative intensity variations, and that changes in fluorescence frequently lead those seen in the EVI for those regions. The derived fluorescence therefore provides information that is related to, but independent of the reflectance.

Citation: Joiner, J., Yoshida, Y., Vasilkov, A. P., Yoshida, Y., Corp, L. A., and Middleton, E. M.: First observations of global and seasonal terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence from space, Biogeosciences, 8, 637-651, doi:10.5194/bg-8-637-2011, 2011.
 
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